WHEN HOUSING AFFORDABILITY IS LOW – APARTMENTS ARE STRONG

June 16, 2014 on 11:48 am | In Buyers, Charts + Statistics, Curious, Economy, Fascinating Information, Investment Opportunities, Market Snapshot, Of Local Importance, Trends, Uncategorized | No Comments

from Jodi Summers

Housing affordability is why you can never go wrong with multifamily properties in Los Angeles – only 23% of homes for sale are affordable to the middle class.

And our affordability is rather peachy compared to our sister city, San Francisco. Trulia notes that only 14% of homes for sale in San Francisco are affordable to the middle class, -even though median household income is higher in San Francisco than almost anywhere else in the country.

Notice that 7 of the 10 least affordable markets are in California. We are rounded out by New York, neighboring Fairfield County, CT, and Honolulu. As you might expect, in our coastal markets – Los Angeles, Orange County, Ventura County, and San Diego – less than one-third of homes are within reach of the middle class. But, everyone has to live somewhere – it might as well be in one of your buildings.

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http://www.trulia.com/trends/2014/05/middle-class-may-2014/

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2682

MORE RESIDENCES FOR DOWNTOWN L.A. THANKS TO ADAPTIVE REUSE

April 15, 2014 on 1:58 pm | In Curious, Fascinating Information, Green, Historic Properties, Money Saving Opportunities, New Developments, Of Local Importance, Problem Solving, Recycling, Uncategorized, WOW | 3 Comments

Edited by Jodi Summers

Bravo to the City of Los Angeles. Through innovative public policy and creative private development, L.A.is demonstrating how older buildings can be repurposed and repositioned for the new economy while reducing carbon emissions.

Believe it or not, Downtown Los Angeles contains one of the nation’s finest collections of early 20th century architecture. Most of these buildings sat vacant for decades, until a carefully targeted Adaptive Use Ordinance (ARO) removed regulatory barriers, provided incentives, and helped make it possible to repurpose more than 60 historic buildings over the past 14 years as new apartments, lofts, and hotels.

But many more buildings remain empty or underused in the downtown area and nearby commercial districts.

 

A recent report from the Urban Land Institute and the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Green Lab concludes that more than 10 million square feet of space in the city’s urban core is currently vacant. The report, Learning from Los Angeles, was presented to Mayor Eric Garcetti this morning, at an event organized by the ULI Los Angeles District Council. It describes strategies that build on the success of the ARO to unlock the economic and community development potential of underused older buildings. The report documents demolition, building, and vacancy trends throughout the city and recommends strategies for removing regulatory barriers, streamlining approvals, and providing incentives to make building reuse easier to accomplish.

Conversations organized by the Preservation Green and ULI Los Angeles identified key barriers to building reuse and recommend solutions to overcome these obstacles. The Los Angeles Conservancy, a key partner in this effort, served on the project Advisory Committee along with practitioners in real estate development, planning, design, construction, community revitalization, and local government.

Learning from Los Angeles is the first in a new series of research and policy reports being developed by the Preservation Green Lab through the Partnership for Building Reuse, a joint effort of the National Trust and ULI. Launched in Los Angeles in 2012, the Partnership for Building Reuse is designed to foster market-driven building reuse in major U.S. cities through dialogues with community stakeholders about building reuse challenges and opportunities.

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http://blog.preservationleadershipforum.org/2013/10/10/learning-from-los-angeles/#comments

http://www.socalofficerealestateblog.com/?p=2458

http://www.socalgreenrealestateblog.com/?p=3018

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2592

TAXES – WHO PAYS WHAT?

March 30, 2014 on 9:19 pm | In Charts + Statistics, Curious, Economy, Experts Say, Fascinating Information | 1 Comment

by Jodi Summers

By taking a population-weighted computation of local sales tax rates and combining it with the prevailing state rate, the Tax Foundation has computed the combined sales tax rate for each U.S. state.

Oregon, Delaware and New Hampshire are the only three states without either state or local sales taxes. The five states with the lowest average combined rates are Alaska (1.69%), Hawaii (4.35%), Wisconsin (5.43%), Wyoming (5.49%), and Maine (5.50%).

Curiously, Tennessee takes the biggest toll, with the highest average combined rate of 9.45%, followed by Arkansas (9.19%) and Louisiana (8.89%). Other states in the top five for the greatest sales tax burden for consumers include Washington (8.88%) and Oklahoma (8.72%).

Keep in mind states with low or no sales taxes often have high income taxes. Oregon is an example. On the other hand, the Tax Foundation notes that Washington State has high sales taxes but no income tax.

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http://www.mainstreet.com/article/moneyinvesting/taxes/top-5-least-shopper-friendly-us-states-taxes?page=1#ixzz2wcyGqsOb

http://www.builderonline.com/local-markets/best-and-worst-states-for-income-property-and-sales-taxes_t.aspx?utm_source=newsletter&utm_content=jump&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=BP_032114&day=2014-03-21

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2670

OUT OF SCHOOL AND STILL @ HOME? – YOUNG ADULTS AND THE LABOR MARKET

March 15, 2014 on 8:28 pm | In Charts + Statistics, Curious, Economy, Events, Fascinating Information, Sellers, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

edited by Jodi Summers

Here’s the premise…a recent study notes the impact structural economic shifts and how it’s impacted new workers in the work force. The results show that young adults are delaying their career launch, as well as leaving home and beginning a life of their own.

In the meantime, older adults are working longer because they’re getting paid better.

The report, “Failure to Launch: Structural Shift and the New Lost Generation” analyzes the divergent labor market trends for young and older adults since 1980. Major findings include:

  • In 1980, young adults reached the middle of the wage distribution at age 26; today, they do not reach the same point until age 30. For young African Americans, it has increased from age 25 to 33.
  • The 2000s were a lost decade for young adults. Between 2000 and 2012, the employment rate for young fell from 84% to 72%.
  • Young adults’ labor force participation rate has returned to its 1972 level, a decline that started in the late 1980s and has accelerated since 2000.
  • Opportunities have especially dwindled for young men, high school graduates, and young African Americans.
  • Older workers aren’t crowding young adults out of the labor market: there are more job openings created from retirements per young person today than there were in the 1990s.

The report, “Failure to Launch: Structural Shift and the New Lost Generation” analyzes the divergent labor market trends for young and older adults since 1980. The report is a joint effort by the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce and The Generations Initiative.

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http://cew.georgetown.edu/failuretolaunch/

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2556

 

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2556http://www.socalofficerealestateblog.com/?p=2431

 

http://www.builderonline.com/business/still-housings-biggest-question-y_c.aspx?utm_source=newsletter&utm_content=jump&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=BP_093013&day=2013-09-30

BEFORE ENTERING INTO A REAL ESTATE PARTNERSHIP, DO YOUR HOMEWORK

January 15, 2014 on 12:07 am | In Buyers, Curious, Experts Say, Fascinating Information, fUNNY...mONEY, Investment Opportunities, Problem Solving, Uncategorized | 1 Comment

by Naomi Shaw

A real estate partnership can be a lucrative venture for many individuals with a limited amount of money to invest. Forming a partnership will increase your working capital, and you’ll be able to buy properties you couldn’t afford on your own.

However, there are some significant risks that can come with forming a partnership. If you choose the wrong person or company to do business with, you could find that your investment quickly becomes a loss.

Before entering into any sort of real estate business partnership, make sure you do your homework on who you’ll be working with.

Knowing Your Partner

Entering into a real estate partnership with another person or company is something you should do only after you understand who you’re working with. While helpful to work with people you know and trust, there are some questions you should ask any person or company before considering a partnership.

● How much money do you have to invest? How is your credit score?

● How many properties do you currently own?

● When do you expect to make a profit from your properties? Do you plan on holding properties for years or do you want a quick turnaround to leverage into other ventures?

● Have you had other real estate partnerships in the past? Do you currently have other real estate partners? Do you have references to any past or current partners?

Understanding Your Partnership Agreement

Before you commit to any type of partnership, it’s essential that you come up with an agreement as to how the partnership is going to work. The most important things you need to discuss when setting up a real estate partnership include:

● How partners will get paid and when. Do partners share profits or are profits tied to resale only?

● What your responsibilities in the partnership are. Usually, one partner will manage properties while another is responsible for finding new properties. Of course, all partnerships differ. Defined roles are important.

● Is the partnership going to be reviewed at certain times? Many partnerships review profits about once per year. After all, not all partnerships are worth maintaining if there’s no growth or profit.

Hire an Attorney

If you form a good partnership, chances are you won’t ever need to consult your attorney. However, you do need to hire a qualified attorney who will help you setup your partnership.

Trying to do it yourself will most likely leave big gaps in your contract, and unless you’re incredibly well versed in business partnerships, those gaps could create potential problems down the road when it becomes time to sell properties, split profits, or dissolve the partnership and its assets.

Hiring an attorney seems costly, but it’s going to cost you a lot less than a business partnership gone wrong.

A real estate partnership is often an excellent way to make more money than you ever could on your own while balancing the work that real estate investing takes. However, partner with the wrong person, and you could end up losing all of the money that you had to invest.

Do your homework and ask questions, and always set up a binding legal agreement that helps both partners understand how they’ll be working together and how they’ll be able to exit the partnership if needed.

Naomi Shaw is a freelance writer in Southern California. She loves real estate and home design, and enjoys covering both topics in her writing. She contributes to HarrisHousePainting.com often.

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http://cpanalytics.com/images/logo_placeStrategy.gif

http://www.biggerpockets.com/renewsblog/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/Partnership.png

http://www.socalindustrialrealestateblog.com/?p=2047

http://www.socalofficerealestateblog.com/?p=2488

http://www.socalmultiunitrealestateblog.com/?p=2615

https://www.sdcba.org/assets/SDCBA/SDCBA/userimages/appeal-attorneys.jpg

 

HAPPY HOLIDAYS A TODOS

December 23, 2013 on 9:26 pm | In Curious, Rents, Uncategorized, WOW | 1 Comment

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