Sustainable Industries’ Top 10 Green Building Products of 2009

November 30, 2009 on 12:06 am | In Experts Say, Fascinating Information, For Your Purchasing Pleasure, Green, Market Snapshot, Money Saving Opportunities, New Developments, Problem Solving, Recycling, Trends, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Sustainable Industries’ Top 10 Green Building Products of 2009

Edited by Jodi Summers

Not to be outdone by other trends, Sustainable Industries magazine has made their choices
for the 2009 Top 10 Green Building Products. These industry-leading green building products
winners were selected by a panel of expert judges and the Sustainable Industries editorial team 
based on their environmental performance, scalability/market impact, innovation,design
aesthetic, value and compatibility with the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design (LEED) rating system. 

The 2009 Top 10 Green Building Product winners are:

Acadia Combined Heating and Cooling System

Made by Hallowell International

(www.gotohallowell.com)

The Acadia is not just another heating and cooling system. It maintains 200 percent efficiency even when outdoor temperatures drop well below zero..should global climate change ever affect us that severely. Acadia users can save up to 70 percent of their home heating energy costs.

ec-H20

Made by Tennant Co.

(www.tennantco.com)

Requiring no chemicals, ec-H2O uses tap water to clean most any surface of most any substance. Each machine reduces water usage by 70 to 80 percent, and the potential of 245 million gallons of water each year if it were installed in all new floor-cleaning machines.

InSpire Wall

Made by ATAS International

(www.atas.com)

This simple technology uses the power of the sun to heat outdoor air before sending it indoors, thereby slashing energy use while boosting indoor air quality. Depending on what kind of heating fuel is being replaced, this product can reduce heating costs by up to $5 for each square foot of InSpire Wall installed.

kama EEBS Structural Systems

Made by kama Energy Efficient Building Systems Inc.

(www.kama-eebs.com)

kama EEBS Structural Systems integrate light gauge metal stud framing system with expanded polystyrene insulation in a proprietary design that eliminates thermal bridging and helps to create a tight, energy-efficient building envelope.

PlybooPure Bamboo Plywood

Made by Smith & Fong Co.

(www.plyboo.com)

Because it’s technically a grass, bamboo had not previously been eligible for FSC certification. But in January 2008, after two years of lobbying, Smith & Fong achieved this first that propelled it to recognition on this year’s Top 10 list.

RainTube

Made by GLI Systems Inc.

(www.raintube.com)

This product received more Top 10 nominations than any other product this year. RainTube is a rain gutter filter made of 100 percent post-consumer high-density polyethylene – old milk jugs, in other words. This product is also Cradle to Cradle-certified, meaning that GLI Systems Inc had to develop a Post-Use Recovery Plan that goes out with every product.

Separett Villa

Made by Separett

(www.ecovita.net/villa)

This urine-diverting composting toilet – which is 100 percent PVC fee –uses no water and keeps solids separate from liquids, reducing odor and making it possible to reuse waste and urine for composting and fertilizing. The Separett Villa can be deployed where no plumbing exists, allowing for a greater reach of the technology.

Serious Windows

Made by Serious Materials

(www.seriouswindows.com)

Serious Windows are so efficient they have the potential to allow for the elimination of a building’s heating system, allowing waste heat from building appliances to serve as the main heat source in some applications. The windows have a full-frame R value of at least five and up to 11, which can cut a building’s energy bills by up to 50 percent per month.

Solatube Daylighting Systems

Made by Solatube International

(www.solatube.com)

This patented technology catches direct sunlight and redirects it down an adjustable-length tube, bringing daylight to parts of buildings that would not otherwise have access to natural light. The Vista, Calif.-based company recently launched a product specifically designed for commercial applications, making it ideal for large-roofed warehouses and manufacturing facilities, as well as retail stores and schools – allplaces that have been shown to benefit from increased daylight, as daylight is linked to higher worker productivity, decreased absenteeism and better retail sales.

Your Old Light Fixture

Made by Eleek

(www.eleekinc.com)

Eleek is the only business to make the Top 10 Green Building Products list all four years. Though not a product, Eleek’s lighting restoration service speaks to the important concept of the re-use of existing goods. When Eleek restores a light fixture, every piece of a fixture is taken apart, repaired and restored to its original splendor. Its wiring is updated to comply with modern codes and standards and a new lamp base is installed so it works with energy-efficient lamps such as CFLs and LEDs.

Original article @ http://www.sustainableindustries.com/greenbuilding/49012336.html

2 Comments »

RSS feed for comments on this post.

  1. Enviroplumbing can handle all of your green plumbing + heating needs.

    http://www.enviroplumbing.com

    Comment by Enviro Plumber — July 19, 2009 #

  2. The article, “Risk of LEED Decertification Looms Large for Real Estate,” stated that “… a little known provision in LEED 2009, which allows LEED certifications to be challenged and removed at any time after they have been certified, presents a threat to all existing and future LEED 2009-certified projects.”

    “The idea that there is this new thing call decertification is inaccurate,” says Scot Horst, USGBC’s senior vice president for LEED. “The way LEED works is we have a rating system; you send us information about your project, and we certify to that. But let’s say that there was someone out there who lied about the prerequisite information or unintentionally provided inaccurate information. We have always had a policy to go back and say this wasn’t what it was represented to be. That is nothing new.”

    Potential ramifications of not meeting LEED’s prerequisites include losing a credit and potentially dropping to a lower LEED certification level. The only way you would ever lose a certification that you’ve already been awarded is if you didn’t meet the prerequisites of the system; USGBC currently does not evaluate or monitor the ongoing operations of a building, Horst adds.

    Comment by MULTIFAMILY EXECUTIVE 2010 — February 18, 2010 #

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Powered by Digital Shake LLC with WordPress